Monday, January 11, 2010

suburb No 18: Ingleside



This week's post is a lot late and a little lean due to a bug that zapped all energy and desire to walk 
to the kitchen let alone roam the streets. It didn't help that the chosen suburb doesn't offer a huge 
variety of imagery. But having said that I think - hope - I've gathered enough pics to paint a fairly 
accurate picture of Ingleside.

When I told friends I was 'doing' Ingleside they either stared at me blankly or thought I was talking about 

Ingleburn, a suburb south of the CBD.

Whilst I at least knew it was north, I couldn't have told you exactly where north. In fact, it ended being 

Suburb No 18 only by accident. After talking to a friend about the Baha'i religion I became curious about 
it. I remembered the Baha'i temple was in the Northern Beaches and when I studied the street directory
I discovered the temple was in a suburb called Ingleside, sandwiched between Mona Vale and Terry Hills 
with Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park to its north and Garigal National Park to its south. What happens
in Ingleside I wondered... suburb No 18 decided.

As it turns out, not a lot happens in Ingleside. But what is amazing is how rural it is. One minute you're 

driving along busy roads and the next, you're in the bush. You see horses but not people. Road signs 
warning you to watch out for 'Dragons'. And driveways the length of small roads leading to - you can only
assume because you can't see them - houses. 

It's just not something you expect to find a mere stone's throw from the ocean and 28 km from the city 

centre. So it didn't come as any surprise to read that Ingleside's days as a low density suburb may 
be numbered as there are plans to populate the area. All the more reason to 'document' the place 
while it's still a breath of fresh air and a little bit of country by the sea...

Part 1: Places of peace

While it originated in Persia/Iran, the Baha'i faith appears to be all about the unity of humankind, 

and the temple, or more accurately House of Worship, is 'offered to people of all nations, backgrounds 
and creeds for prayer and meditation'. Just like the bush it's set in.



either way







heavenly light








both planted from another land








nine is the magical number :: 1








all roads lead to heaven








sunset






 
i see stars





Part 2: Room for all



where all religions can sit side by side








nine is the magical number :: 2








white-topped like his temple





Part 3: More horses than people



-head






stripes








bend








pink and red









B is for Beautiful









snap








a girl and her pony should always wear checks








need new shoes?





Part 3: It's a sign... you're far from city life



and fierce looking fruit








a map scribbled in the tree








you know you want me








le poo





Part 4: Zen-ish moments


 
1







 
2







 
3


Ingleside is beautiful in its quiet and isolation. And horses being my favourite animals just made it all 
the more magical. Despite the fact most of us city dwellers live like sardines and you can see the need 
for more housing in Sydney, I secretly hope Ingleside remains the domain of the equine, the duck and 
the dragon.

Provided no more hideous bugs come my way I'll see you with the next suburb this Friday.

21 comments:

  1. Hi Louise
    I'm so glad you posted on such an unknown semi-rural suburb. It's nice to remember how many obscure and unique places Sydney has!

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  2. Wow...I suspect it's typical but I had no idea such an amazingly different place existed still in Sydney~ LOVE the two photos of the tree and horse's neck and the Baha'i concept of tolerance and peace is really beautiful and just what the world seems to need at the moment :)

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  4. Wow - I didn't know trees could have creases!
    Love the bend photos and the 'all roads lead to heaven' photos.

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  5. I've only just discovered your photo project mere days ago. It is too wonderful! Hard to leave the site and get things done...but I'm not complaining. Love your pairings of amazingly beautiful photos.

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  6. Thanks all, comments much appreciated.
    I love that bendy tree too - I am still wondering why and how it grew like that. I stood looking at it for ages hoping it might reveal its secret, but no, the mystery remains.
    Louise

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  7. I visited Ingleside in Dec last year for the first time for a wedding reception. I had never heard of it even though I had driven past the Baha'i temple for years. I love that I now have a bit of background on the suburb. I was surprised by the cicadas too, haven't seen so many for years. I love following your exploration of Sydney suburbs.

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  8. I'm a born and bred Sydney girl now living in Perth and I found out about this site reading a mag at the gym this morning. Lovely to see Ingleside (one of the northern beaches' many hidden treasures). I grew up in the area and have fond memories of sitting in the back of my parents old Holden chugging past the magnificent Baha'i Temple.

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  9. what a trooper you are going out when sick! stunning as usual.

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  10. Jo, Jenni and sophg
    Thanks, Ingleside is definitely one of those sleeper suburbs. Interesting to see what happens to it in the next decade as pressure is put on to populate it.
    Louise

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  11. Ahh I always love driving past the Baha'i temple, not only to see how beautiful it looks on a bright sunny morning, but because my lover lives at Bayview. I secretly want to visit it one day <3

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  12. I don't even know how to describe how surreal a place like this is. The sacred places look almost abandoned and it's a great thing to see you pull all these places out of storage and back onto the map for other people to enjoy.

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